Worst Jobs For Highly Sensitive People (5+)

This guide will discuss some worst jobs for highly sensitive people, along with some of the best job options for them.

Worst Jobs For Highly Sensitive People

If you are a highly sensitive person, you need to avoid jobs which 

  • Deal and entertain people for long hours and continuously.
  • Requires too many confrontations.
  • Are too challenging and risky.
  • Are timed, measured, or controlled.
  • Are predominantly focused on sales and market and only about money-making and do not coincide with your interests or principles.
  • Are overly competitive.
  • Takes place in a crowded, loud, and busy environment.
  • Includes ‘cold calling’ (for introverted highly sensitive people).
  • Primarily includes teamwork and less individual work (for introverted highly sensitive people).
  • Requires continuous, monotonous works instead of different tasks and projects.

Some of the worst jobs or profession for highly sensitive people are listed below:

  • Executive Positions 
  • Public Relations
  • Customer Care Representatives
  • Lawyer
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Executive Positions

Managers and authority positions have to take responsibility for the other people. As a Highly Sensitive Person, you are already taking the emotional burden and responsibility for the surrounding people, taking this job can be extremely challenging and worst for your well-being. 

A highly sensitive person in authority positives will be required to have twice the sense of responsibility, taking the daily concerns and issues and internalizing them. This will make extremely difficult to disconnect from the work when the office hours are over,

  • Public Relations

All people in public relations are practically on the stage, during their work hours. Highly Sensitive People need solitude and alone time. This is not an option but a requirement for them to function normally. However, it is not possible while working in public relations for more than 35 hours a week.

Visibly, this makes for the worst jobs for highly sensitive people.

  • Customer Care Representatives

A highly sensitive person is prone to deep feelings and associating with things personally. Typically, most highly sensitive people are empaths and they are susceptible to absorbing the emotions of other people. In customer care positions, highly sensitive people are required to listen to their complaints and issues on a regular basis. These problems are primarily retail or technical related, but to highly sensitive people, they are perceived personally,

  • Lawyer

Conflicts can strongly impact and disturb the delicate balance of highly sensitive people.

Lawyers or attorneys have to make their living on conflicts and arguments. They also have to deal with justice and have regularly faced it. 

Highly Sensitive People have a natural desire to help people with their problems, and such an overwhelming and exhausting to see the unfair and unjust verdicts. 

  • Sales and Marketing

The idea of sales and marketing can make highly sensitive people overwhelm and break out in cold sweats. Some of the reasons behind it are:

  • highly sensitive people are strongly attuned with the reactions of people.
  • highly sensitive people can read body language and distinct responses which other people may not notice.
  • They can catch when your actions and words are not matching.
  • This can be a natural turn-off for the highly sensitive people and they translate it to rejection, and they might overthink about it the entire day.

Highly sensitive people possess great qualities which can be fruitful in the workplace. Highly sensitive people are

  • Independent, and require slight external supervision.
  • Great listeners
  • Fair and just
  • Loyal and committed
  • Meticulous and deeply think through the project
  • Detail-oriented
  • Organized
  • Keenly observant to small insignificant details, like tone and body language of the clients (highly intuitive).
  • Sensitive to the needs and emotions of the people in the office or workplace.

Given below is the list of jobs that are best matched with the traits of highly sensitive people, although in reality, your happiness in the work environment may depend on numerous other factors like physical environment, company culture, boss and colleagues, etc.

  • Health and Care Related Professions: Medical Records Technicians, Dieticians, Naturopath, Alternative Medicine, Holistic Medicine Practitioner, Therapists, Counselors, ergonomic consultants.
  • Technology Professions: Social Media Managers, Graphic Designs, Software Developers, Healthcare systems analysts, programmers.
  • Animal-Related Profession: Animal groomers, dog trainers, dog walkers, veterinarian
  • Artistic Professions: Actors, artists, musicians, art/music teacher, fashion designer, interior designer, photographer, Voiceover artists, narrators
  • Financial Professions: Auditor, accountant, financial analysts, purchaser, controllers, market researchers.
  • Writing Professions: Authors, writers, editors, bloggers, proofreaders, technical writers, etc.
  • Nature Related Professions: ecologist, botanist, biologist
  • Trades: gardener, landscaping
  • Personal chef 
  • Life or Career Coaches
  • School Counselor 
  • Antique appraiser
  • Therapists/psychologists
  • Researchers
  • Librarian
  • Non-profit organizations
  • Yoga instructors
  • Social Workers
  • Teachers

The best jobs for highly sensitive people ideally utilize their unique skills and talents to differentiate between the external stimulus and that stimulus is not strong or intense enough to hinder their functioning.

Highly Sensitive People do not function greatly in a timed and monotonous job. They need sufficient time off and need regular breaks in between, as they have natural tendencies to exhaustion and draining.

The best jobs for people with Highly Sensitive People should include sufficient engagement with other people so as to not make them feel isolated and withdrawn, but also as not to overwhelm them with overstimulation.

Being an empath or Highly Sensitive People can be draining and exhausting. On top of it the Highly Sensitive Person is introverted it can be even more overwhelming to deal with careers that have lots of confrontation and communication.

Are You A Highly Sensitive Person?

You can self-assess if you are a Highly Sensitive Person if you feel you can soak and absorb the energy from your environment. You can be receptive to the emotional and energy stimulus from your surroundings. If you feel overwhelmed and exhausted from crowded and loud places, then chances are you might be one of the Highly Sensitive People.

As per Dr. Elaine Moran, author, and researcher of the sensory processing sensitivity, or Highly Sensitive Persons, if you answer the following questions with more numbers of Yes, then you are categorized as Highly Sensitive People.

  • Do you have a complex and rich inner life?
  • Are you easily overwhelmed by intense and bright light, different fabric types, strong smells, or loud noises around you?
  • Do you typically avoid violent movies, TV shows, and visual content?
  • Do you get confused and panic when you have too much to do in a short duration?
  • Do you discern and enjoy fine and delicate scents, sounds, tastes, and works of art?
  • Do you need to have downtime to yourself away from busy days, in your bed in a darkened room, or some other secluded place where you can have privacy and entertainment from that situation?
  • When you were a child, did your parents and teachers recognize you as a shy or sensitive child?
  • Do you make it a priority to organize your life to prevent upsetting and overwhelming situations?

If you answer yes to most of the above-mentioned questions, you are a Highly Sensitive Person, and thus, it can help in dealing with the situations, accordingly.

Conclusion

This guide discussed some worst jobs for highly sensitive people, along with some of the best job options for them.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Worst Jobs For Highly Sensitive People

What is the best job for a highly sensitive person?

Some of the best jobs for highly sensitive people include:

  • The care professions
  • Clergy
  • IT Professionals
  • Non-profit professional jobs
  • Academia
  • Creative professionals
  • Business Owners

Is a highly sensitive person a mental disorder?

As per Aron’s conception of high sensitivity, Highly Sensitive Persons do not have a mental disorder. It is defined as other aspects of personality, like the traits present in every person to different degrees. Although there are various drawbacks connected with high sensitivity, research suggests it also provides certain adaptive benefits.

What is the best career for an empath?

Most empaths are sensitive to huge crowds so they prefer quiet and calm careers. Some empaths go for creative options like librarians, writers, and artists. Caregiving jobs like veterinarians, teachers, and nurses can be too emotionally exhausting options for sensitive empaths.

Are highly sensitive persons gifted?

The majority of people think giftedness is a rare and special trait or quality that only occurs in 1, 3, or 5 % of the population. If we go by this definition then all highly sensitive persons are certainly not gifted people. They are found in around 15 to 20 % of the population.

Do highly sensitive persons need more sleep?

Yes, highly sensitive persons need high-quality sleep, and is extremely important for them. The majority of the highly sensitive persons require eight hours, and many sleep more than nine or ten hours each night. If they are not getting enough sleep, they are prone to burn and inclined towards anxiety, depression, and eventually become less functioning.

Are highly sensitive persons more intelligent?

Highly sensitive persons have high sensitivity and more emotional intelligence. They use their emotional intelligence differently but effectively.

Reference

https://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbradberry/2016/08/30/9-signs-youre-a-highly-sensitive-person/

Paranoid Personality Disorder (A Comprehensive Guide)

This comprehensive guide will provide the entire account of Paranoid Personality Disorder 2, including the symptoms and causes. Moreover, it will explain its diagnosis and treatment as well.

Paranoid Personality Disorder 2

Paranoid Personality Disorder (PPD) is a type of severe personality disorder. It is an eccentric personality disorder, suggesting that the patient’s behavior can be unusual and strange to others. A person with Paranoid Personality Disorder is extremely suspicious of others intentions and motives. They have severe distrust and other people are there to get them. Additionally, Paranoid Personality Disorder Is characterized by reluctance to confide in people, hold grudges, and discovering threatening and devaluing subtexts in the apparently plain and direct comments in any event. An individual with Paranoid Personality Disorder can be quick to react in the form of hostility and anger directed towards others.

Paranoid Personality Disorder initially shows signs in early adulthood or childhood. According to the Cleveland Clinic, Paranoid Personality Disorder is seen to be more common in males as compared to females.

Paranoid Personality Disorder’s treatment can be tricky and challenging, people with Paranoid Personality Disorder have strong suspicions and mistrust of the world and people in it. A mental health practitioner is required to build trust with the patient. The confidence encourages the patient to trust the professional to treat the condition.

What Are The Main Causes Of Paranoid Personality Disorder?

The precise cause of paranoid personality disorder is unknown, but it comprises the psychological and biological factors. Paranoid Personality Disorder is most common in people with close relatives with schizophrenia suggesting a genetic association between the disorders.

What Are The Key Symptoms Of Paranoid Personality Disorder?

Usually, people with Paranoid Personality Disorder do not find their behavior inappropriate or problematic. To them, they are being rational and aware of the world and people. However, people around them can notice and observe the distrust and often regard it offensive and unwarranted. The people with Paranoid Personality Disorder can be rigid and hostile in their behavior. They may respond sarcastically, which usually exhibits a violent reaction from people, and later claim their suspicions to be true.

Some people with Paranoid Personality Disorder may have conditions which can aggravate their paranoia. For instance, anxiety and depression can influence a person’s emotion. Mood swings can make people with Paranoid Personality Disorder even more isolated and paranoid. 

Some of the symptoms of Paranoid Personality Disorder are given below:

  • Being hypersensitive to criticism.
  • Having doubts about the loyalty of people around them.
  • Believing that other people have hidden motives to use them or harm them.
  • Having trouble working in a team.
  • Getting detached or socially distant from others.
  • Getting hostile and angry quickly.
  • Having a hard time relaxing.
  • Have difficulty in seeing their own problems.
  • Being defensive and argumentative.

Some of the symptoms of Paranoid Personality Disorder are similar to other conditions. Borderline Personality Disorder and Schizophrenia are the other disorders with symptoms like Paranoid Personality Disorder. Hence, it can be challenging to clearly diagnose those disorders.

Yes, paranoid personality disorder is susceptible to worsening with age. According to Dr. Rosowsky, Paranoid Personality Disorder along with other personality disorders, like schizotypal, schizoid, obsessive- compulsive disorder, narcissistic, histrionic, dependant, and avoidant disorders are likely to worsen with age.

What Is The Diagnosis For Paranoid Personality Disorder ?

If the Paranoid Personality Disorder exhibits physical symptoms of the condition, the medical practitioner will start assessing and evaluating a comprehensive psychiatric and medical history, and if mentioned, a physical examination. Although there are no laboratory tests requirements to diagnose personality disorders, the doctor may use a variety of diagnostic tests and criteria to rule the possibility of other physical sickness as the cause of presented symptoms. 

If the physician does not find any physical reason for the presenting symptoms, they may refer the patient to a psychologist, or psychiatrist, medical care professionals who are specifically trained to diagnose and treat mental disorders. Psychologists and psychiatrists used specific standardized interview and evaluation tools to diagnose the people for a personality disorder.

Criteria For The Diagnosis Of Paranoid Personality Disorder 

Clinical criteria according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition [DSM-5] for the diagnosis of paranoid personality disorder, patients must have

  • “A persistent distrust and suspiciousness of others

This distrust and suspicion are shown by the presence of ≥ 4 of the following:

  • Unjustified suspicion that other people are exploiting, injuring, or deceiving them
  • Preoccupation with unjustified doubts about the reliability of their friends and co-workers
  • Reluctance to confide in others lest the information be used against them
  • Misinterpretation of benign remarks or events as having hidden belittling, hostile, or threatening meaning
  • Holding of grudges for insults, injuries, or slights
  • Readiness to think that their character or reputation has been attacked and quickness to react angrily or to counterattack
  • Recurrent, unjustified suspicions that their spouse or partner is unfaithful.”

Also, symptoms should have presented in the early adolescence.

How is the Paranoid Personality Disorder Treated?

Treatment of Paranoid Personality Disorder can be successful if the patient is willing to place their trust in the doctor and treatment. Majority of the patients with Paranoid Personality Disorder do not see their behavior as problematic so they usually avoid the treatment. However, to build the trust of the patient towards a long-term treatment, talking therapy or psychotherapy is initially advantageous towards the wellbeing of the person. The methods discussed in therapy will:

  • Help in reducing the feelings of paranoia.
  • Help in developing coping strategies to manage the condition.
  • Help in communicating with people in social events and gatherings.
  • Improve the social skills and interactions of the people.
  • Build the self-esteem of people with Paranoid Personality Disorder.

Medication is although not the main focus of the treatment for Paranoid Personality Disorder. Nonetheless, medications including antidepressants, anti-anxiety, or antipsychotic drugs are usually prescribed to people with Paranoid Personality Disorder symptoms, if they are severe. 

What Are The Complications Associated With Paranoid Personality Disorder?

The thinking patterns and behavioral changes linked with Paranoid Personality Disorder can influence the people’s ability to establish and maintain personal relationships, and function properly in social and work situations. Typically, people with Paranoid Personality Disorder can involve themselves in legal battles, suing the companies or people they deem are against them and hurting them.

What Is The Perspective of People With Paranoid Personality Disorder?

The perspective of people with Paranoid Personality Disorder keeps changing. Paranoid Personality Disorder is a chronic illness, suggesting it may last a lifetime. Although some people are able to function well with Paranoid Personality Disorder and marry and maintain jobs, some are entirely dysfunctional due to this disorder. As the people with Paranoid Personality Disorder are reluctant to treatment, they often face poor outcomes.

Can Paranoid Personality Disorder Be Treated and Stopped?

Although Paranoid Personality Disorder can not be prevented entirely, treatment can help the person with Paranoid Personality Disorder function in a productive manner and handle daily life situations. 

Conclusion

This comprehensive guide provided the entire account of Paranoid Personality Disorder 2, including the symptoms and causes. Moreover, it explained its diagnosis and treatment as well.

Paranoid Personality Disorder (PPD) is a type of severe eccentric personality disorder, implying that the patient’s behavior can be unusual and strange to others. A person with Paranoid Personality Disorder is extremely suspicious of others intentions and motives.If you are someone with paranoid personality disorder or know someone with this condition, please reach out to a mental health practitioner to help manage the condition and symptoms.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Paranoid Personality Disorder 2

Is it possible to have 2 personality disorders?

According to DSM-5, a person can be diagnosed with more than one personality disorder. A person diagnosed with personality disorder is most frequently qualified for more than one diagnosis. Any person with extreme personality disorder may meet the criteria for five or even more than that disorder. 

What triggers paranoid personality disorder?

The precise cause of paranoid personality disorder is unknown, but it comprises the psychological and biological factors. Paranoid Personality Disorder is most common in people with close relatives with schizophrenia suggesting a genetic association between the disorders.

What are the symptoms of paranoid personality disorder?

Some of the common symptoms of paranoid personality disorder are listed below:

  • Being hypersensitive to criticism.
  • Having doubts about the loyalty of people around them.
  • Believing that other people have hidden motives to use them or harm them.
  • Having trouble working in a team.
  • Getting detached or socially distant from others.
  • Getting hostile and angry quickly.
  • Having a hard time relaxing.
  • Have difficulty in seeing their own problems.
  • Being defensive and argumentative.

At what age does paranoid personality disorder begin?

Paranoid Personality Disorder usually begins in childhood or shows initial symptoms in early adolescent years. It is more common in men than women.

Does paranoid personality disorder get worse with age?

Yes, paranoid personality disorder is susceptible to worsening with age. According to Dr. Rosowsky, Paranoid Personality Disorder along with other personality disorders, like schizotypal, schizoid, obsessive- compulsive disorder, narcissistic, histrionic, dependant, and avoidant disorders are likely to worsen with age.

Does paranoia go away?

Usually feelings of paranoia are not a concerning cause and eventually goes away after the situation is over. However. When paranoid feelings are beyond the range of normal experience, it becomes problematic. Problematic Paranoia can be aggravated with drug use and mental health problems.

References

https://www.healthline.com/health/paranoid-personality-disorder

https://www.caringfortheages.com/article/S1526-4114(08)60024-4/pdf

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (A Comprehensive Guide)

This comprehensive guide will provide the entire account of the Oppositional Defiant Disorder, including the symptoms and causes. Moreover, it will explain its diagnosis and treatment as well.

What Is The Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is a behavioral disorder in which children may display patterns of anger or crankiness, defiance, or combative behavior, and be vengeful towards authority figures. Such behavior of children usually affects their routine, which includes school and at-home activities.

Children are no stranger to defying authority every now and then–especially in their pre-teens and teens. They may manifest defiant behavior by disobeying, arguing, or talking back to the elders, teachers, or parents. However, if this behavior is prolonged to 6 months or more, and the behavior is getting more extreme than usual, it may suggest that the child has Oppositional Defiant Disorder.

A study suggests that about 2 to 16 % of teens and children have Oppositional Defiant Disorder. In young children, Oppositional Defiant Disorder is typically more common among boys. However, in older children, Oppositional Defiant Disorder is found to be equally prevalent among boys and girls. Oppositional Defiant Disorder usually begins by the age of eight.

Numerous teens and young children can have other behavioral disorders, like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mood disorders, learning disabilities, and anxiety disorders. Some kids with Oppositional Defiant Disorder can exhibit more severe behavioral disorders known as conduct disorder.

What Are Key Symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

Some of the key symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder are listed below:

  • Repetitive temper tantrums
  • Excessive arguments with elders and adults, especially the ones with authority.
  • Blaming others for your mistakes.
  • Refusing to comply with rules and requests.
  • Being vengeful and spiteful
  • Frequent and severe bursts of resentment and anger.
  • Annoying and upsetting behavior towards others, or being easily bothered by others’ behaviors.
  • Blurting hateful and mean things in anger.
  • Using obscene and swear language.

Additionally, numerous children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder are easily frustrated, moody, and have low self-esteem. They sometimes may use or abuse alcohol and drugs.

What Are The Causes And Risk Factors of Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

The precise cause of Oppositional Defiant Disorder is still not known. However, a combination of genetic, biological, and environmental factors can contribute to the disorder:

  • Family History: Many teens and young children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder have close relatives with mental disorders, including mood disorders, personality disorders, and anxiety disorders. This shows there could be a genetic route to getting Oppositional Defiant Disorder.
  • Brain Chemistry: Oppositional Defiant Disorder has been associated with certain brain chemicals or neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters help in efficient brain functioning. If these chemicals are not functioning properly, causing symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder and other mental disorders. Children and teenagers with Oppositional Defiant Disorder may have other mental disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, anxiety, or mood disorders, which can aggravate the behavior problems.
  • Temperament: Children with trouble controlling their emotions are also likely to develop Oppositional Defiant Disorder.
  • Miscellaneous Brain Difference: If the child has experienced injuries or defects in areas of the brain can cause serious behavioral issues in children.
  • Family issues: Children with dysfunctional families, substance and drug abuse and disciplinary actions by authority figures and parents may result in behavior disorders.
  • Friends and Peers: Attention from fellows and peers sometimes reinforce Oppositional Defiant Disorder behaviors.

How Is Oppositional Defiant Disorder Diagnosed?

Mental disorders, like Oppositional Defiant Disorder in children, are also diagnosed, based on the physical signs and symptoms. If the symptoms have been observed by the doctor and an evaluation is done through medical history and physical examination. Although there are no laboratory tests to particularly diagnose Oppositional Defiant Disorder, the practitioner may use some tests like blood tests, or neuroimaging studies to rule out the possibility of other medical conditions.  The doctor will also look for other conditions that accompany Oppositional Defiant Disorder, like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and depression.

If the medical practitioner cannot observe any physical cause for the symptoms, they might refer the child to a psychiatrist or child psychologist, mental health professional trained to diagnose and treat mental disorders in teens and children. Psychologists and psychiatrists use specifically designed interviews and evaluation tools to treat mental disorders. The doctor bases their diagnosis on the symptoms and behaviors of children. The doctor relies on the reports from teachers and parents, and other adults because typically children find it troublesome to explain their concerns and symptoms.

What Are The Home Care Tips And Treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

Treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder is based on a number of factors, including the child’s age, the intensity of symptoms, and the child’s ability to participate and tolerate particular treatment methods. Treatment typically involves the combination of the following methods:

  • Family Therapy: It may help in improving the interaction and communication among the family members. A specific therapy procedure of parent management training (PMT) guides the parents about the effective ways to positively modify the behavior of their children. Behavior management aims to establish contracts between children and parents, where positive behavior is rewarded and there could be punitive measures for negative behaviors.
  • Psychotherapy: This counseling technique helps the child develop efficient coping mechanisms, social skills, and problem-solving behaviors, reactivity management to manage their anger. Another technique of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) can help in reshaping the cognition of a child to modify and improve his behavior.
  • Medication: There are no formal medications approved to treat Oppositional Defiant Disorder, but sometimes certain drugs can be prescribed by the doctor to treat the symptoms. The commonly used medication for Oppositional Defiant Disorder includes stimulants for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a comorbid condition with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, in such a case Atomoxetine is typically prescribed. Moreover, the majority of the children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder also have comorbid depression, and in this case, antidepressants like fluoxetine are prescribed.

Specific at-home strategies to manage the child’s Oppositional Defiant Disorder include the following:

  • Praise and encourage good and healthy behavior.
  • Give rewards, certificates, and gifts on good behavior, particularly for young children.
  • Modeling the behavior, you want to see in your child can be an effective way to modify their behavior.
  • Stay away from power struggles.
  • Be mindful of your fights, and don’t mindlessly start arguments.
  • Set clear boundaries and limits.
  • Follow a schedule and code of conduct.
  • Spend quality time together and include activities that you mutually enjoy.
  • Make sure collaboration in the family and consistent team efforts.
  • Include the child in household chores or tasks at home.
  • Don’t lose your temper if they are not showing improvement right away.
  • Get support for yourself as well.

What Can Be Complications Due ToOppositional Defiant Disorder?

Teens and children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder may typically face trouble at home, school, and personal relationships. Oppositional Defiant Disorder may cause:

  • Antisocial behavior.
  • Poor performance at school or work
  • Hard time controlling impulses
  • Substance and drug abuse
  • Suicidal thoughts.

Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder may often develop the mental health concerns and conditions like:

  • Conduct disorder
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Learning Disorders
  • Communication Disorders

What is the Oppositional Defiant Disorder Outlook?

Treatment can be effective if started early. If the child shows symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder, immediately consult a qualified mental health professional. In the absence of treatment, children might face struggles in social environments like they may have to face rejections from peers due to behavioral issues and lack of social skills. A child with Oppositional Defiant Disorder also has a higher chance of developing more severe behavioral disorders like conduct disorder.

How can Oppositional Defiant Disorder Be Prevented?

Although Oppositional Defiant Disorder cannot be prevented completely, recognizing the behavior and symptoms as early as possible can help manage the onset of the disorder. Family members can learn strategies to follow if there is a chance or signs of relapse. Providing encouragements, a supportive and consistent nurturing environment at home with healthy affection and discipline can help in controlling the symptoms and prevent the defiant symptoms and behavior.

Conclusion

This comprehensive guide provided the entire account of the Oppositional Defiant Disorder, including the symptoms and causes. Moreover, it explained its diagnosis and treatment as well.

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is a behavioral disorder in which children may display patterns of anger or crankiness, defiance, or combative behavior, and be vengeful towards authority figures. Such behavior of children usually affects their routine and social skills and behavior.

If your child is experiencing oppositional defiant disorder symptoms, consult a qualified mental health practitioner or a counselor.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Are Oppositional Defiant Disorder And Conduct Disorder the same?

No, Oppositional Defiant Disorder and conduct disorder are not the same. However, they belong to the same class of disruptive behavior disorders.

The main distinction between Oppositional Defiant Disorder and conduct disorder is that the former, there may not be extreme behaviors like firesetting, running away from school, or violence against the weak or young children or animals. All these instances are the traits of conduct disorder.

What medication is used for Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

The commonly used medication for Oppositional Defiant Disorder includes stimulants for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a comorbid condition with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, in such a case Atomoxetine is typically prescribed.

Moreover, the majority of the children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder also have comorbid depression, and in this case, antidepressants like fluoxetine are prescribed.

What causes Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

Some of the major causes of Oppositional Defiant Disorder include biological, psychological, or environmental factors. In the majority of the cases, there is not a single definite cause, and multiple factors come into play to cause the Oppositional Defiant Disorder in children.

The maintaining factor to assess the cause of Oppositional Defiant Disorder is the behavior and reaction of people around whom they act this way.

References

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/oppositional-defiant-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20375831

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/oppositional-defiant-disorder

Dermatillomania (A 3 point Guide)

This blog provides a detailed and comprehensive guide to Dermatillomania. It will delve into the details of symptoms, causes, and treatment of Dermatillomania.

What Is Dermatillomania?

Dermatillomania or Excoriation disorder commonly referred to as chronic skin picking disorder. It is a mental condition that shows itself as compulsive and repetitive skin picking. It is an impulse control disorder and one of the many body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs) currently categorized in the DSM-5 under the Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders (OCD) and related disorders. Dermatillomania is prevalent in up to 1.4 % of the entire population, and about 75% of them are female. 

Dermatillomania and normal skin picking are different. It is a chronic condition that can result in various tissue damage and cause distress and dysfunction in life.

Excessive and repetitive skin picking can be manifested in the forms of hair pulling, scraping, squeezing, biting, or lancing both damaged and healthy skin from several body parts. People with Dermatillomania often pick at the skins of their lips, face, fingers, hands, arms, and legs. They may use their fingers or other tools like pins or tweezers. They may indulge in this habit for several hours a day, which can even extend for months and years. Dermatillomania can cause visible damage to the skin, and lesions can result in disfigurement, open wounds, discoloration, infections, and scars. 

Dermatillomania is a chronic illness, however, its symptoms may come and go from time to time. People with Dermatillomania may spend hours contemplating this habit of fighting the urge to give in. Depression, anxiety, fear of exposure, shame, and embarrassment about the condition often conceal the skin with clothing, makeup, or by some other way. It can also interfere with the social presence, often leading to uncomfortable relationships with friends and family. Dermatillomania cannot be diagnosed when the symptoms are caused due to other underlying psychiatric or medical conditions. For example, skin picking can often be caused by autoimmune disorders, dermatological infections, opiate withdrawal, or developmental conditions, like autism.

What Are The Symptoms of Dermatillomania?

According to DSM-5, a person with excoriation disorder or Dermatillomania shows the following signs and symptoms:

  • Recurring skin picking may cause skin lesions.
  • Repeated and constant struggle to stop the habit.
  • The condition causes clinically recognized impairment or distress.
  • The symptoms are not due to medical or substance, or any dermatological condition.
  • The symptoms can not be better explained with any other psychiatric condition or disorder.

What Are The Causes of Dermatillomania?

The precise cause of Dermatillomania is yet to be identified. However, evidence shows that there could be a genetic element to Dermatillomania, some people have inherited traits of skin pulling, hair pulling, etc. It is also characterized by higher than usual changes in mood and anxiety disorders. Other factors that may contribute to causing this condition include stress, temperament, and age. Chronic skin behavior also coexists with the start of puberty, and also dermatological issues, like acne. Dermatillomania can also be linked with perfectionism, leading to over-grooming. Or, it can also manifest as a way to avoid stressful situations or release tension that builds up due to frustration, impatience, dissatisfaction, or sometimes boredom.

Things To Try If You Skin Picking Disorder

Things To Do

  • Keep your hand engaged–try to have stress buster toys, softball, or put on gloves.
  • Avoid the triggers that cause you to pick your skin.
  • Challenge yourself and resist your urges to pick skin.
  • Care and Pamper your skin when you are urged to pick your skin–for instance apply hand cream when you feel like biting your nails or picking at your skin.
  • Talk to people and tell them to stop when they see you picking at your skin.
  • Keep the skin clean to prevent infections.

Things Not To Do

  • Don’t grow long nails–trim them regularly.
  • Don’t keep tools like pins and tweezers where you can easily access them.

You Need To See a General Physician if:

  • You are unable to stop yourself from picking at your skin.
  • You are damaging your skin by picking at it, like cuts that don’t heal in a few days.
  • Your skin-picking behavior is causing significant emotional distress or dysfunction in life.

What To Expect From Your Appointment

Your doctor will ask some questions regarding your skin picking behavior and examine your skin. If the doctor thinks your skin needs the intervention of a skin specialist, he’ll refer you to them.

This may involve medication or talking therapy. 

A dermatologist or skin specialist might be referred if your skin has serious damage or other underlying skin problems that are causing the skin picking behavior, like eczema or acne.

What Are The Treatment Options For Dermatillomania?

Research shows that both medication and psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can efficiently reduce symptoms of Dermatillomania.

  • Medication: efficient treatment may include the application of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), usually antidepressants which can also help them in reducing obsessive thoughts and compulsive habits.
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Psychotherapy: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy helps the clients understand their thoughts and patterns of behavior are connected and how they can together reduce this repetitive behavior. Clients can learn in psychotherapy how to stop or manage their intrusive thoughts so that they avoid skin picking. 

Habit reversal training helps by

  • Recognizing and promoting awareness of your skin picking and the triggers.
  • Replace skin picking behavior with less harmful or productive behavior.

Co-Occurring Conditions

Dermatillomania co-occurs with other conditions like obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), major depressive disorder, and trichotillomania (hair-pulling). A study shows that 38% of patients with Dermatillomania have co-occurring trichotillomania. 

Other body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs) like nail-biting can also coexist with Dermatillomania.

Conclusion

This blog provided a detailed and comprehensive guide to Dermatillomania. It delved into the details of symptoms, causes, and treatment of Dermatillomania.

Dermatillomania or Excoriation disorder commonly referred to as chronic skin picking disorder. The repeated picking of one’s own skin results in skin lesions and also causes disruption in their life.

If you have this skin-picking condition, let us know in the comments how you manage and cope with this behavior?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Dermatillomania

Is Dermatillomania a mental illness?

Yes, Dermatillomania is a mental illness closely associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Dermatillomania or Excoriation disorder commonly referred to as chronic skin picking disorder. The repeated picking of one’s own skin results in skin lesions and also causes disruption in their life.

What triggers Dermatillomania?

Although there could be a genetic element to Dermatillomania, some people have inherited traits of skin pulling, hair pulling, etc. It is also characterized by higher than usual changes in mood and anxiety disorders.

How do you stop Dermatillomania?

You can try to stop Dermatillomania in some of the following ways:

  1. Keep your hand engaged–try to have stress buster toys, softball, or put on gloves.
  2. Avoid the triggers that cause you to pick your skin.
  3. Challenge yourself and resist your urges to pick skin.
  4. Care and Pamper your skin when you are urged to pick your skin–for instance apply hand cream when you feel like biting your nails or picking at your skin.
  5. Talk to people and tell them to stop when they see you picking at your skin.
  6. Keep the skin clean to prevent infections.

How do I know I have Dermatillomania?

In order to tell if you have Dermatillomania, check if you are habitual of excessive picking, scratching, gouging, or squeezing at an otherwise healthy skin. People with Dermatillomania typically pick at their skin on the face and lips, however, it can be any body part, like scalp, hands, or arms.

References

American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Edition.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/conditions/dermatillomania-skin-picking

Depression Test (3 Minutes Quiz)

This brief guide will offer a depression test that takes only 3 minutes to assess and later will discuss DSM-V criteria for the diagnosis of depressive disorder, the causes, and the treatment options for depression.

Depression Test 3 Minutes

Almost 20 million of the American population experience depression, however, but not many seek treatment. The Depression self-test is a simple quiz to help you identify the symptoms of depression and its intensity in your life. Depression is not just a feeling of sadness, it is a real mental condition characterized by uncontrollable sadness and despair.

The following depression test will help you rate the symptoms of depression. Try to observe your routine over the past fifteen days, and rank the questions, 5 being always and 1 being never.

  • Have you experienced extreme sadness, most of the time without any real reason?
  • Have you observed a drastic change in your appetite?
  • Have you observed a drastic change in your sleep pattern?
  • Are you fatigued or lethargic without even doing much work?
  • Do you cry without any apparent reason?
  • Do you think there is no joy and excitement in life?
  • Are you contemplating existence and death?
  • Do you think life would be better if you were not here, without actively trying to take your life?
  • Are you hopeless about the future?
  • Do you think you are worthless?
  • Do you think no one can help you in your situation or there is no one that can understand?
  • Do you find it impossible to find the motivation to do anything?
  • Have you noticed that you are not much bothered about any self-care activities?
  • Do you feel like a loser?
  • Do you feel hopeless?
  • Do you feel like being alone most of the time and start avoiding people you usually liked?
  • Do you have trouble sleeping or staying asleep?

If you ranked between 3-5 to more than 12 of the above questions then you might be facing the signs and symptoms of depression. For an official diagnosis for depression, you must visit a mental health professional or a psychiatrist. They will run a sequence of diagnostic questions to unveil the symptoms of depression. Clients must spend some time with their physician to discuss their moods, signs, symptoms, and behavior. However, if you do notice some signs and symptoms of depression in you, you must go to a qualified mental health practitioner to get an official diagnosis.

DSM-V Criteria For Depression Disorder

Five or more of the symptoms have been persistent in the two weeks and show a change from previous functioning; at least one of the symptoms is either loss of pleasure or interest or depressed mood.

  • Depressed mood most of the day, almost daily, as shown by either subjective reports (feeling sad, hopelessness, emptiness) or observation made by others (apparently tearful). In children and adolescents, it can be irritability.
  • Significant loss of interest or joy in all, or almost all activities, most of the day, almost daily (as shown by either subject account or observation).
  • Significant weight loss or weight gain without conscious efforts.
  • Loss or increase in appetite.
  • Hypersomnia or insomnia
  • Loss of energy or fatigue
  • Psychomotor agitation or retardation almost daily. 
  • Feelings of worthlessness or excessive misplaced guilt (maybe delusional) almost every day (not just self-reproach or guilt about being ill).
  • Loss of concentration and focus, indecisiveness, almost every day ( either by the subject themself or observations).
  • Recurring thoughts of death (not just fear of death), recurrent suicidal thoughts, and ideation without.

1.  Precise plan, or a suicide attempt, or a planned scheme for committing suicide.

2. The symptoms that result in clinically significant worry or change in occupation, social, or other important areas of functioning.

3. The depressive episode is not characterized by the physiological impacts of a substance or other medical condition.

Note: 1-3 are the symptoms of a major depressive episode.

4. The existence of the major depressive episode is not better explained by schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, delusional disorder, or other specified and unspecified schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders.

5. There has never been a hypomanic or manic episode. 

What Are The Symptoms of Depression?

During the depression, the following symptoms of low moods are exhibited:

  • Feeling of hopelessness, worthlessness, and overall pessimist view.
  • Loss of energy
  • Not able to enjoy the things that they previously did.
  • Trouble focusing
  • Forgetfulness
  • Slow speech
  • Less libido
  • Inability to feel pleasure
  • Uncontrolled crying
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Needing more sleep
  • Trouble in decision making
  • Appetite changes leading to weight gain or weight loss.
  • Death or suicidal thoughts
  • Attempts to suicide. 

In Addition to the low mood, depression affects the ability to think, focus, or make bad decisions, rendering them more dysfunctional. Depression can also cause memory difficulties and experience cognitive difficulties. Children with depression may exhibit low or poor grades in their results, depicting poor focus.

What Are The Causes Of Depression?

The causes of depression can be diverse and unique to each person. Some may observe depression due to traumatic and abusive events or relationships, negative intrusive thoughts, low self-esteem, and low serotonin levels.

Genetic causes have been researched to cause moderate to severe depression. It has been found that if the parents have depression, there is a 15 to 20% chance of a child having a mood disorder as compared to the other population, which makes for 1 to 2%.

The environmental causes of depression are more common and often result due to prolonged suffering, like problems at school or work, or difficult marriage.

Adversaries of any form contribute as an acute stressor that transpires to form depression. Most of the physical conditions are non-specific stressors but some of them transpire to form depressive disorder through a direct biological process. For instance, depression after giving childbirth, postnatal depression is a common occurrence in women.

What Is The Treatment For Depression?

Some of the treatment options for depression are described below

Medication

Medication is the primary treatment, majorly involving:

  • Antidepressants
  • Mood stabilizers, like lamotrigine, carbamazepine, valproate, or lithium.
  • Antipsychotic drugs like quetiapine, cariprazine, olanzapine, and lurasidone.
  • Anti-anxiety pills or sleep medicines like benzodiazepines or sedatives.
  • Antidepressant-antipsychotic drugs, a combination of antidepressant and mood stabilizers.

It can take some time to discover the right combination for you. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should talk to their doctor about medications that are safe for safety.

Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy is also recommended, along with medications. Some of the options in this regard are:

  • Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (ISPRT)
  • Psychoeducation
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  • Family-focused therapy

Lifestyle Changes

  • Some lifestyle changes can also be helpful:
  • Regular exercise and workout regimen
  • Follow a routine
  • Learn to pick your mood swings.
  • Get support from family, friends, or groups.
  • Learn to manage stress.
  • Keep a journal or chart for your symptoms.
  • Find sports and healthy hobbies.
  • Avoid alcohol or recreational drugs.

The more you know about your mental conditions and symptoms, the better you’ll be able to manage your condition. It will be helpful to have a compassionate company to manage your condition. Support groups and friends can help you in talking through the situation.

Conclusion

This brief guide offered a depression test that takes only 3 minutes to assess and discussed DSM-V criteria for the diagnosis of depressive disorder, the causes, and the treatment options for depression.

Depression disorders, according to the DSM 5 are a period of at least two weeks when a person experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and had a majority of specified symptoms, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, or self-worth.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Depression Test 3 Minutes

What is the DSM 5 definition of depression?

The clinical definition of depression, according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM-5), is “a period of at least two weeks when a person experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and had a majority of specified symptoms, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, or self-worth.”

Is it possible to diagnose yourself with depression?

For an official diagnosis of depression, you must visit a mental health professional or a psychiatrist. They will run a sequence of diagnostic questions to unveil the symptoms of depression. Clients must spend some time with their physician to discuss their moods, signs, symptoms, and behavior. However, if you do notice some signs and symptoms of depression in you, you must go to a qualified mental health practitioner to get an official diagnosis.

What are the 5 signs of mental illness?

  • Social isolation and withdrawal
  • Drastic and dramatic changes in appetite and sleep.
  • Excessive worry, anxiety, or paranoia.
  • Prolonged sadness or irritation.
  • Extreme mood swings.

How many categories of depression does the DSM 5 recognize?

There are now eight specific disorders mentioned in the depressive disorders chapter of DSM 5. These categories are listed below:

  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Disruptive mood Dysregulation Disorder
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)
  • Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder 
  • Substance//Medication-induced Depressive disorder
  • Depressive disorder due to other medical condition
  • Other specified depressive disorder
  • Unspecified depressive disorder

What are the DSM IV criteria for depression?

DSM IV criteria for depression include depressed mood throughout or most part of the day, for at least two years with the existence of two or more of the following symptoms that can cause a clinically prominent change in work, social, or other important aspects of functioning:

  1. Lack of appetite or overeating.
  2. Insomnia or hypersomnia
  3. Fatigue or lack of energy
  4. Worthlessness or excessive guilt
  5. Recurring death thoughts
  6. Loss of interest or pleasure in most activities
  7. The depressed mood throughout the day
  8. Unintentional weight gain or loss.
  9. Agitation or psychomotor retardation is experienced by others.

References

https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/education/medical-school/departments/psychiatry/research/center/self-rating-test.html

https://psychcentral.com/quizzes/depression-quiz

Depression Monologues (5+List)

This blog lists and explains the most heartbreaking depression monologues.

Depression Monologues

Depression monologues are literature that depicts extreme and uncontrollable sadness and symptoms of depression, like lack of sleep and food.

The depression monologues show deeper, romanticized, and tortured insights of depression as told by the troubled minds of literary geniuses.

The depression monologues can be an exemplary representation of depression in literature history.

The Bullied, Bungled and Botched by D.M. Larson

“Strong Enough For Both of Us” is a classic monologue about depression by D.M. Larson. It delves deeper into the skin of the person suffering from depression. It truly is the depiction of hopelessness and helplessness faced by depressed people.

“Yes, you’re right. I have to toughen up. There’s always someone who has it worse than me. Sorry, I am so depressed all the time. Sorry, I bring you down. I don’t mean to ruin your day. Or your life. I’d love to stop being depressed. I wish I could look on the bright side and turn that frown upside down. I wish it were that easy. 

You think it’s my fault, don’t you? You think it’s all in my head. Yes, we all have this problem, don’t we? We all get a little blue sometimes. I get very blue all the time. I’m so blue I’m purple. Don’t tell me you understand… you don’t understand! 

Do you really know how this feels? Do you really know how this grips me inside and threatens to rip me apart? Do you know the weight that holds me down, a weight so powerful I can hardly move? 

Yes, I’m using this to punish you. I am angry at you so I’m acting this way to hurt you… I need to stop feeling sorry for myself… Me, me, me… yes, it’s all about me. I want you all to drop everything and focus on me! I’m sorry I even came out of my room. 

Oh yeah… a nice cup of tea will instantly cure me – maybe if you put some strychnine in it. I wish I could just snap out of it… like it was some kind of spell a witch cast on me. I’m waiting for some prince to come along and kiss my tears away. 

Don’t worry. I won’t say anything anymore. I didn’t want to bring it up. I didn’t want to talk about it anyway… 

I bet you’re sorry you asked how I was doing. How am I doing anyway? I’m hurting so bad. I wish there was something that would take away the pain. I can’t handle this much longer. 

All I want to know is that I’m not alone… that I’m important to someone. Maybe I want a hug sometimes. Maybe I want someone to tell me I’m not going crazy, that’s it’s not really my fault. 

I need to know I didn’t do this to myself and that I’m not the cause of this horrible thing that’s happening to me. I want someone to be here for me and help me through this. I need someone stronger than me. I’m so weak. I need someone who is strong enough for both of us. 

I need to know you’ll be there for me. I need to know you’ll never give up on me. That you’ll never leave me. That you’ll never go away. And I need someone to help me not give up on myself. I want to know that I’m important. That I matter. That I’m loved. Tell me that things will get better. It helps to have someone to talk to. It helps to say something Thank you for listening. Thank you for not leaving me alone anymore.”

The Bell Jar Monologue by Sylvia Plath

Sylvia Plath was a renowned author and poet. She suffered from huge and deep waves of depression in her adult life and eventually succumbed to self-destruction.

Her most widely known work The Bell Jar shows a dramatic monologue representing her severe struggle with depression.

“I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn’t quite make out. I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn’t make up my mind which of the figs I would choose. I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.”

Unbroken by D.M. Larson

This depression monologue is a somewhat romanticized version of depression. While it talks about the struggles of depression, it also highlights and romanticizes how a significant person can change the outlook of the person

“You found me, cast aside, lost and broken. You searched through the rubble to find the severed pieces of my life, and slowly fit them back together again.

Before you, I felt like I was dying. The panic consumed me and squeezed the life from my heart. But I didn’t care. When we are weighed down by the torture of hate, we don’t fear death. There was nothing to live for until I met you.

You rebuilt me and fixed what was broken. You made me better and pieced me back together in new ways that improved me. With the right parts, I was reborn. And life felt real. And right for the first time.”

The Darkness

The following monologue again shows the comforting and romantic notions, a depressed person feels towards darkness. Depression is highly characterized by the love for darkness, However, the darkness accompanied with loneliness makes a comforting space for the person.

“I wish I was scared of the dark. I mean, most people are, but I always find comfort sitting in it. Get home, shower, then lay in bed. Don’t turn the lights on my daily routine. Sit in the dark and listen to music. A vampire. That’s what my mom calls me. It’s not that I don’t like the light. You just think differently in the dark. You find comfort in it like a big black blanket wrapped around you. You just let go, not knowing what could happen. Your mind travels to so many places, and everything’s fine. Until you realize you’re alone. The feeling of loneliness hits you. You have no one to talk to. Everyone’s asleep. You’ve thought so much that the big black blanket is now suffocating you. So, tell me, is the darkness safe or dangerous?”

Wasteland by D.M. Larson

D. M. Larson shows the side of depression that is defined by overthinking. The narrator tells that it is important to avoid any deeper truths because that’s a wasteland.

“We live in a world where lies keep us quiet. Lies comfort us and allow us to go about our lives without worry. Why worry when we know nothing of the truth? Every wish is granted and this manufactured reality protects us from the unknown.

Don’t meddle in things you don’t understand. Be thankful for what you have. Don’t let whispers of the outside world cloud your judgment. It’s a wasteland outside these walls. These walls protect us and keep us safe. Our leaders watch over us. Always watching.

They know everything about us: our every need, our every desire, our fears, our thoughts. They know us better than we know ourselves. Don’t bother with fantasies of what was and what could be. That’s not important anymore. What’s important is that we have each other and we have everything we need to live. We don’t need anything else.”

Misplaced

In the following female drama’s monologue, Misplaced, the protagonist narrates the feeling of depression. She highlights the extreme disconnect she experiences from herself and life generally. It is a vivid and saddening depiction of a state of helplessness. 

“I listen inside myself to the hum…this humming sound, between my ears, deep within my brain somewhere…when I listen to it, when I pay attention to it, everything goes into slow motion.  My concentration intensifies and the humming gets worse; worse in the sense that, there’s a danger that starts bubbling up in the pit of my stomach, and then a vibration echoes through me, through the rest of my body…I start to get mixed in my brain; panicky, worrisome; a tunnel I’m trapped inside of or a drowning kind of sensation but more like an emotional drowning, not so much physical…

It can last for hours and hours…one time, it even lasted for days, and even when I regained my sense of self, it took me time to feel like me again.  I don’t know what you call this. Maybe I’m losing my mind, and it frightens me, to be honest. I’ve never uttered a word to this before to anyone I know! Thank you for hearing me out.”

Conclusion

This blog listed and explained the most heartbreaking depression monologues.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Depression Monologues

What are the DSM IV criteria for depression?

DSM IV criteria for depression include depressed mood throughout or most part of the day, for at least two years with the existence of two or more of the following symptoms that can cause a clinically prominent change in work, social, or other important aspects of functioning:

  1. Lack of appetite or overeating.
  2. Insomnia or hypersomnia
  3. Fatigue or lack of energy
  4. Worthlessness or excessive guilt
  5. Recurring death thoughts
  6. Loss of interest or pleasure in most activities
  7. The depressed mood throughout the day
  8. Unintentional weight gain or loss.
  9. Agitation or psychomotor retardation is experienced by others.

What is the DSM 5 definition of depression?

The clinical definition of depression, according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM-5), is “a period of at least two weeks when a person experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and had a majority of specified symptoms, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, or self-worth.”

References

https://freedramaplays.blogspot.com/2015/10/strong-enough-for-both-of-us-monologue.html

https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/7511-i-saw-my-life-branching-out-before-me-like-the

ISFP Anime characters (7+ List)

This blog will look into the details and description of 11 significant ISFP anime characters. It will give an insight into the ISFP personality traits of each character.

Significant ISFP Anime Characters

Some of the significant ISFP anime characters are given below:

  • Tatsumi from Akame ga Kill
  • Sasuke Uchiha from Naruto Shippuden
  • Ryuko Matoi from Kill La Kill
  • Simon from Gurren Lagann
  • Eren Yeager from Attack on Titan
  • Haruka Nanase from Free!
  • Ojiro Mashirao from My Hero Academia
  • Genya Shinazugawa from Demon Slayer
  • Asahi Azumane from Haikyuu!
  • Thorfinn Karlsefni from Vinland Saga
  • James from Pokemon

ISFP Personality Traits

ISFP is one of the 16 personality types identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. ISFPs are usually described as quiet, happy-go-lucky, and peaceful people. ISFPs try to keep their options open, so they typically delay the decision-making process in hopes that things might change or new options might come up. According to MBTI, ISFPS are compassionate, friendly, quiet, and sensitive people. Unlike the extroverts who are revitalized by interactions with other people, introverts must expend energy around people. After spending time around people, introverts mostly need their downtime to function optimally. Therefore, they prefer to indulge with a small close group of friends and family members.

ISFPs are quiet and reserved, they are famous for being careful, peaceful, and considerate. ISFPs’ easy-going nature and are accepting of other people. ISFPs are meticulous and focus on the details. They are focused on the here and now and do not worry much about the future. ISFPs are the doers instead of the dreamers. They don’t like abstract ideas and love to play and act rationally. They like to have hands-on experience. ISFPs focus on personal concerns instead of logical and objective information. ISFPs have their personal value system and make spontaneous judgments depending on how they fit their ideas. ISFPs have extraverted sensing as auxiliary functions. They are tuned with the sensory information and are observant of their environment. Their tertiary function is introverted intuition. This function runs in the background, feeding off the extraverted sensing function. They have strong gut feelings regarding all situations and events. While they do not like abstract theories and concepts, their introverted intuition leads them to experience epiphanies. Some of the popular ISFPS are 

Marilyn Moroe, actress

Harry Potter, a fictional character

Neil Simon,  playwright

Auguste Rodin, sculptor

David Beckham, soccer player

Without further ado, let’s get into the details of ISFP anime characters.

  • Tatsumi from Akame ga Kill

Tatsumi is the main protagonist of the anime show Akame Ga Kill!. He lives for the moment and truly believes in the fact that you only live once, so he might as well make use of all the energy and resources in the here and now. He is optimistic and idealistic. Tatsumi has big hopes and dreams. However, he does not feel confident to share it openly with others. He is friendly but he has a few close-knit friends with whom he is his most comfortable self.

Although it is mostly debated to be an extrovert,  he does not show any real extroverted tendencies.

  • Sasuke Uchiha from Naruto Shippuden

Sasuke Uchiha is an interesting character where he played both the antagonist and protagonist in the anime show Naruto Shippuden. Sasuke is undoubtedly a prominent ISFP anime character. Although his introversion is all but evident by the anime, some anime fanatics prefer to label him an INTJ.

Sasuke is more inclined towards the ISFP despite his introversion, and he is quite an emotional person. He is not a fan of thinking ahead of time–he likes to look in the past. Sasuke would rather play alone than lead the pack.

  • Ryuko Matoi from Kill La Kill

Ryuko Matoi is the protagonist of the short-lived anime show Kill La Kill!, is a competitive, independent, but not so social fighter whose number one priority is to get the tasks done in the best way possible.

She can be hot-headed at certain times, and she believes in her gut feelings rather than overspending her time on thinking.

  • Simon from Gurren Lagann

Simon from the anime show Gurren Lagann is an ISFP anime character, similar to Tatsumi. They both are young and just learning how the world works. They also have a small bunch of friends but feel nervous when they are around other people.

Simone’s personality characteristics changed a bit over the course of the series, but not that significant to change his Myers=Briggs Type.

  • Eren Yeager from Attack on Titan

Eren Yeager is the main protagonist of the anime show Attack on Titan. He has innate stoicism that is characteristic of an ISFP personality. His associations to the ISFP types are mainly because he prefers to follow his feelings without the need to get approval from others, 

Eren Yeager works great as a team, but his goal is to do his part and perform his duties. That said, he does not make extra efforts to ‘go beyond’ his means to be successful.

  • Haruka Nanase from Free!

Haruka Nanase is one of the protagonists of the sports-based anime show Free! He is one of the iconic examples of modern ISFP characters. He can be extra grim at certain times, and he is not directed towards long-term goals or future plans.

Nonetheless, despite his inability to express his feelings, he undoubtedly has a lot. He also enjoys some experiences of life–especially water sports, like swimming.

  • Ojiro Mashirao from My Hero Academia

Ojiro Mashirao from the famous anime show My Hero Academia is one of the peaceful ISFPs–he still possesses all the core characteristics of an ISFP, but apart from that, he does not have any of negative traits. He is introverted and calm, and he likes to keep his feelings to himself. His motivation is to make sure everyone is heard and not to ignore or push others away.

He is conscious and aware of the environment around him. Sometimes even if he looks calm and aloof, but he is not, he is all aware.

  • Genya Shinazugawa from Demon Slayer

Genya is a character from Demon Slayer. He is a perfect example of a hot-headed ISFP character who can’t be reasoned with. He is independent and free. He lives for no one but himself. However, when the need arises, he holds his moral grounds and recognizes the needs of others

  • Asahi Azumane from Haikyuu!

Asahi Azumane is one of the popularly known ISFP anime characters from a volleyball-based anime show Haikyuu! He is a strong attacker and he can defeat his opponents, often leading them to victory.

However, he is too humble and does not like taking the credits for his accomplishments. Unlike the other team players, he does not play the sport for the social aspect, but he enjoys the adrenaline rush and the thrill the game provides.

  • Thorfinn Karlsefni from Vinland Saga

Thorfinn Karlsefni is the protagonist of the anime show Vinland Saga. He is a pure ISFP; Thorfinn didn’t feel the need to express his emotions or run into situations impulsively. This is how it has always been for him because he has never done it in any other way.

Mostly, ISFP personality types are the most likely to change their types laters, as he has not been encountered as an opposing type. He is not aware if he is secretly garnering feelings that coexist with that personality type or not.

  • James from Pokemon

James from the popular anime Pokemon is value-driven with his Feeling function and has strong emotions about most things. However, he does not know how to express his feelings too well. James can be a bit shy and struggles to show what he truly feels and means to others as well. He can be seen as caring and loving, considering he is a villain. He can be a bit romantic and amicable in an ISFP manner but not like the NF style; thus his Fi dominant makes him this way. 

James has family issues and avoids facing them immediately and pushes them under the rug and escapes from his home. Later, he has to confront his family and past loved ones again. James lives in the moment and responds to the details around him spontaneously. He can be a bit impulsive and responds to situations, often without prior thinking or planning. He is also unconfident or somewhat worried at times showing his Te inferior function. He has to psych himself and try to behave bravely and more efficiently to get his goals achieved and be a more confident person as a whole in life and confront his problems head-on. James is an interesting character overall and one of the best ISFP characters. 

Conclusion:

The blog described 11 ISFP anime characters. It also discussed the characteristics of the ISFP personality type.

ISFP is one of the 16 personality types identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. ISFPs are usually described as quiet, happy-go-lucky, and peaceful people. They are the fourth most common personality type. 

Do you agree or disagree with our list of ISFP Anime characters? Do you have any suggestions for the character? Feel free to write in the comments below.

FAQs on ISFP Anime Characters

How rare is ISFP?

ISFPs are the fourth most common personality type in the population. They make up 9% of the general population.

Who should an ISFP marry?

ISFP’s natural partners are ENFJs or ESFJs. ISFP’s dominant function is Introverted Feeling best paired with a person with the dominant function of Extraverted Feeling. However, two well-developed individuals of any personality type can have a healthy relationship.

Is ISFP lazy?

ISFPs can be lazy. They tend to take things easy and savor the moments, thus making them slow-movers at some times, which can be frustrating to others.

What are ISFPs good at?

ISFPs are good at things that require creativity and aesthetics. They are exceptional at the interior and fashion designing. Some of them find their places in cosmetology, art, and architecture. Others excel as jewelers, carpenters, and chefs.

Are ISFPs selfish?

Yes, ISFPs can come across as selfish and unreal. This is because they mostly focus on their own perspective.

What is the rarest personality type?

INFJs are the rarest personality type in the U.S, with around 1.5 % percent of the population coming in this type.

References

https://www.truity.com/personality-type/ISFP

https://www.16personalities.com/

What To Say To Someone Having A Panic Attack Over Text

This brief guide will discuss what to say to someone having a panic attack over text.

What To Say To Someone Having A Panic Attack Over Text

Helping someone during a panic attack over the phone can be challenging. Nonetheless, it is possible.

When someone is experiencing a panic attack, and you can stay on the phone, whether or on-call or over text. You need to keep them online if they are not too responsive. Keep reassuring them or send emojis to know you are there through their storm.

  • “I know this is an overwhelming situation, but you are doing a good job. I am proud of you.”
  • “You can get through this.”
  • “Tell me what I can do for you? What do you need right now?”
  • “Stay with me, and keep listening to what I am saying.”
  • “Focus on your breathing. Stay in the present. Breathe with me.”
  • “I may not know exactly how you are feeling, but we’ll get through this together.”
  • “Tell me 5 things that you can touch in your vicinity? Name 5 colors around you right now? Tell 5 smells in the room? Is there anything that you can taste or eat nearby?”
  • “You are a brave young man/lady; you have got this.”

You may not necessarily know how to take out the person from their panic mode over the phone. However, your reassuring presence will be more helpful to the person than you may think. It is suggested to only offer constructive and doable advice; if you can’t do that, it’s best to stay quiet and present with their experience.

It is essential to ground the person and ensure they are connected with reality. So if someone is reaching out to you in their time of need, i.e., you must ensure you are sincerely present with them during a panic attack.

Panic attacks can be challenging, and devising coping strategies for such situations is essential to get you through the situations. If you are unable to manage your panic attacks, consider seeking a qualified professional therapist; they will work with you to find the solution.

What Are Panic Attacks?

A panic attack is characterized by the rush of emotional and physical symptoms due to severe fear and anxiety, causing a state of intense arousal, which may exhibit itself as physical pain and constricting feeling in the heart.

Panic attacks can make them feel like they are dying, and the feeling of impending doom is a big symptom of a panic attack. The diagnostic criteria for panic attacks as described in DSM 5 are as follows:

A panic attack is a sudden surge of intense fear or discomfort that reaches a peak within minutes, and during this time, four(or more) of the following symptoms are exhibited:

Note: The sudden surge can happen from a state of calm or anxiousness.

  • Shaking or trembling
  • Sweating
  • Palpitations, rapid heart rate, or pounding heart.
  • Shortness of breath 
  • Choking feelings.
  • Chest pain or congestion feeling.
  • Nausea or abdominal distress.
  • Heat or chills sensation.
  • Lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting
  • Paresthesias (feeling of numbness or tingling sensations).
  • Fear of losing control or feeling like they are going crazy.
  • Feel like dying
  • derealization (unreal) or depersonalization (detachment from one’s self).

Note: At least one of the panic attacks has been followed by a month (or more) of one or both the following:

  • Persistent worry or concern regarding additional attacks and their impacts (Going crazy, loss of control, and having a heart attack).
  • A significant maladaptive behavioral change related to the attacks (strategies to avoid panic attacks, like exercises and active lifestyle).

Any other mental disorder does not explain the disturbance ( panic attacks do not happen as a response to social situations, as in social anxiety disorder; in response to the phobic objects, as in particular phobia; obsessions, as in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); in response to traumatic events, like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or in response to separation from an attachment figure, like separation anxiety disorder).

Helping Someone During a Panic Attack

If someone you know has a panic attack, they may become extremely anxious and not think clearly. You can help them by doing the following:

  • Stay with the individual and keep calm.
  • Speak to them in simple, short sentences.
  • Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
  • Offer them medicine if the person takes it during a panic attack.
  • Don’t make any assumptions about what they need. So it is best to ask them.
  • Help slow down their breathing by breathing with them or by counting steadily to 10.

It is helpful if you say the following things to the person:

  •  “You can get through it.”
  • “Tell me what I can do for you.”
  • “Concentrate on your breathing.”
  • “What you are feeling is scary, but it is not dangerous.”
  • “I am proud of you.”

These simple guidelines can be beneficial in the following ways:

  • Reduce the amount of stress in stressful situations.
  • Help in controlling a confusing situation.
  • Prevent the situation from a worst-case scenario.

You can provide continuous help as the person tries to recover from panic disorder:

  • Encourage the person to proceed with therapy at their own pace.
  • Be present and patient towards the recovery process, even if the person is not accomplishing all the milestones.
  • Do not panic when the person panics.
  • Accept the current situation, but stay aware that it will not last forever.
  • Remember to take care of yourself.

What Things Not To Say To Somebody During A Panic Attack

There are certain things that you should absolutely never say to someone during a panic attack. It won’t help the person in calming the situation, nor will it diffuse their panic. Following are some of the things you should avoid saying to people experiencing a panic attack:

  • Don’t say “calm down.”
  • Don’t disregard their state. Refrain from “it is all in your head.” or “It will be fine, or it will pass.”
  • Don’t embarrass or shame them for their condition. Nothing along the lines of “here we go again” or “here comes the drama queen/king.”.
  • Don’t minimize by bringing up your own experiences. “It happened to me too.” “I got anxiety too, and I did this.”
  • “Don’t think of scary things.”
  • “You aren’t trying hard enough.”
  • “You are blowing it out of proportion.”

Avoid all the condescending and minimizing things to someone who is having a panic attack can make the symptoms even worse. This can also make them feel isolated and embarrassed of their condition, and they may not reach out for help.

Encouraging statements is not necessary; sometimes, silent presence can be helpful, or trying out breathing exercises with the person can help them calm down.

Grounding Techniques to Cope During A Panic Attacks

Grounding techniques and strategies can help during a panic attack. It helps in taking the person out of their head and focus on the present.

  1. Breathing Exercise: Breathing is vital to surviving the chaos. Practice meditation and deep breathing. Focusing on your breath to calm your mind and body will help you get out of the problematic situation. It will help you in reducing the physiological reaction coming from your brain after piercing the danger.
  2. Walk, Move, Dance: The energy built up in your body due to the panic attack may render you immobile and frozen. It is essential to train your mind to keep functioning in this situation. Diffuse the pent-up energy by walking, moving, or even dancing.
  3. Imagine Your Happy Place: Try to drift your thoughts towards the solution. Think of the happy place and focus on that thought.  Your happy place could be an island where sunshine pours down on you or as plain as a walk in the park. Imagining and focusing on the happy place will divert your anxious thoughts.
  4. Question Your Anxious Thoughts: The panicky thoughts usually just focus on the negative scenarios. Try to focus and question your thoughts about the positive outcomes and scenarios. This will help you in getting through the situation.
  5. Practice and Train your Mind through Meditation. Meditation helps in calming your mind and body; it trains your mind to remain under control even in the conflict scenario. Once you have trained your mind, it will help you gauge through difficult situations without yelling in frustration.
  6. Consult a therapist and ask for help. If you think the situation is too overwhelming for you, don’t hesitate to seek professional help. Seek a competent counselor to help you manage your emotions effectively. Alternatively, you can express it with your trusted friend or family.

Conclusion

This brief guide discussed what to say to someone having a panic attack over text. If you or your loved ones experience panic attacks, seek the help of a professional mental health practitioner.

Panic attacks may feel like the world is crumbling apart, and you are dying. It aggravates the feeling of loss of control and heightens their emotional condition. Grounding the one who is experiencing a panic attack is essential to their well-being. Helping them over a text can be challenging, but being present is key to the solution. Reassure them that they will get through the situation and they are not their condition. Help them focus on their breathing and get them out of their head. With authentic concern and support, you can help a person during a panic attack over text.

If you have any suggestions, questions, or comments about the panic attacks, please let us know in the comments.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): What To Say To Someone Having A Panic Attack Over Text

What do you say to someone who is having a panic attack?

  • “You can get through it.”
  • “Tell me what I can do for you.”
  • “Concentrate on your breathing.”
  • “What you are feeling is scary, but it is not dangerous.”
  • “I am proud of you.”

How do you comfort someone with anxiety?

  1. “I’m always here if you need to talk.”
  2. “Let’s sort this together.”
  3. “How can I help?”
  4. “This feeling will pass.”
  5. “Take your time.”
  6. “Your worries/fears/triggers are not invalid.”

How do you calm a panic attack?

Practice breathwork to calm yourself in a panic attack.

  1. Breathe in deep and slowly through your nose.
  2. Breathe out deeply and slowly through your mouth.
  3. Some may find it effective to count steadily from one to five with each breath they take. 
  4. Shut your eyes and be mindful of your breathing pattern.

Do hugs help anxiety attacks?

It is not advised to hug someone during anxiety attacks, especially when someone is particularly sensitive to touch. Nonetheless, it is an effective way to soothe a child. 

Hugging may help in reducing stress and decrease the risk of depression, anxiety, and illness. Hugs may even help in healing. 

References

https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-topics/hw53602

https://themighty.com/2018/03/how-to-help-friend-having-panic-attack-on-the-phone/

Do I Have Anxiety Test (5 ways To Assess)

This article will provide a comprehensive guide to the question “Do I have Anxiety”  and assess the symptoms of anxiety. It will also look into the types of anxiety disorders and some potential anxiety treatments.

Do I Have Anxiety Test?

Given below is a list of questions that can help you identify if you have signs of generalized anxiety disorder or GAD. The most commonly used tool for measuring anxiety is the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale.

On a scale of 1 to 5, rate the following questions where 1 implies to never and 5 implies to very often. 

  • Do you worry about various things?
  • Do you get annoyed and/or easily irritated when anxious?
  • Do you find it challenging to control your worries?
  • Do your worry or anxiety make you feel lethargic or fatigued?
  • Does your worry or anxiety interrupt falling and/or staying asleep?
  • Does worry or anxiety make it difficult to concentrate?
  • Do you feel on edge?
  • Do you worry about how better you do things?
  • Do you worry about the future?
  • Do you worry about things that have already occurred in the past?
  • Do your muscles get tensed when you feel anxious or worried?
  • Do you experience recurring thoughts that are discomforting and unwanted?
  • Do you observe strong, strong fear, inducing panic, shortening breath, chest aches, a pounding heart, nausea, shaking, sweating, dizziness, and/or fear of dying?
  • Do you ever avoid places or social environments for fear of panic?
  • Do you experience repetitive behaviors to control your worries (locking doors, counting, washing hands, repetitive words, etc.)?

This questionnaire is NOT a diagnostic tool. This questionnaire can be used for personal knowledge but not the diagnosis. Mental health disorders can only be diagnosed by a licensed mental health practitioner or doctor. Furthermore, if you experience any of these somatic symptoms, you must consult a doctor, as these symptoms could be due to some other underlying illness.

What Is Anxiety?

Anxiety is a normal stress response and sometimes is beneficial in certain situations. It helps in alerting people of some dangers and helps them prepare and focus on the way out.

However, anxiety disorders differ from the normal feelings of anxiousness and nervousness, as it includes excessive anxiety and fear.

Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental disorder and influence almost 30 % of adults at some stage of their lives. 

Anxiety disorders can cause people to avoid triggering situations or places or things that worsen the symptoms. These disorders can influence job performance, school productivity, and personal relationships.

Types of Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety disorders include the disorders which share the characteristics of excessive anxiety and fear and additional behavioral disturbances. 

DSM 5 includes the following anxiety disorders:

  • Selective Mutism 
  • Separation Anxiety Disorder
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Panic Disorder
  • Agoraphobia
  • Social Phobia or Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Substance or Medication Induced Anxiety Disorder
  • Anxiety Disorder Due to Other Medical Condition

The most commonly observed anxiety disorder is generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), so in the next few sections, we’ll be looking into the details of symptoms and treatments.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) include the following:

  • Extreme fear or anxiety induced by the actual or forecasted exposure to two or more of the following conditions:
  1. Being in closed-off places.
  2. Being alone outside of the house.
  3. Standing in line or a crowd.
  4. Being in open areas.
  5. Using public transportation.
  • They avoid the situations because the person believes they may feel stuck or help might be unavailable in the situation, that the person begins to panic.
  • The above-mentioned situations usually induce anxiety or fear.
  • The situations are avoided, require help from a loved one, or are endured with a strong fear.
  • The fear is out of proportion to the possibility of danger.
  • The avoidance or fear is persistent, as it stays for at least six or more months.
  • The avoidance or fear causes significant distress.
  • If another medical condition occurs along with the disorder, the fear or avoidance is undeniably excessive. 

Panic Attacks

A panic attack is characterized by the rush of emotional and physical symptoms due to severe fear and anxiety, causing a state of intense arousal, which may exhibit itself as physical pain and constricting feeling in the heart.

Panic attacks can make them feel like they are dying, and the feeling of impending doom is a big symptom of a panic attack. The diagnostic criteria for panic attacks as described in DSM 5 are as follows:

A panic attack is a sudden surge of intense fear or discomfort that reaches a peak within minutes, and during this time, four(or more) of the following symptoms are exhibited:

Note: The sudden surge can happen from a state of calm or anxiousness.

  • Shaking or trembling
  • Sweating
  • Palpitations, rapid heart rate, or pounding heart.
  • Shortness of breath 
  • Choking feelings.
  • Chest pain or congestion feeling.
  • Nausea or abdominal distress.
  • Heat or chills sensation.
  • Lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting
  • Paresthesias (feeling of numbness or tingling sensations).
  • Fear of losing control or feeling like they are going crazy.
  • Feel like dying
  • derealization (unreal) or depersonalization (detachment from one’s self).

Note: At least one of the panic attacks has been followed by a month (or more) of one or both the following:

  • Persistent worry or concern regarding additional attacks and their impacts (Going crazy, loss of control, and having a heart attack).
  • A significant maladaptive behavioral change related to the attacks (strategies to avoid panic attacks, like exercises and active lifestyle).

Any other mental disorder does not explain the disturbance ( panic attacks do not happen as a response to social situations, as in social anxiety disorder; in response to the phobic objects, as in particular phobia; obsessions, as in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); in response to traumatic events, like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or in response to separation from an attachment figure, like separation anxiety disorder).

What Causes Anxiety?

Researchers are still discovering the exact cause of anxiety. However, it is likely caused by a combination of factors. These factors may include environmental and genetic factors and brain chemistry. Additionally, researchers are of the opinion that the areas of the brain controlling fear are typically affected when a person is experiencing anxiety.

Ongoing research about anxiety aims to take a  deeper look at the parts of the brain involved with anxiety and panic. 

Factors that can increase the risk of anxiety disorder are listed and described below:

  • Genetics: If someone in the family has an anxiety disorder, then you have a high chance of developing one too. The risk is higher if either of your parents has anxiety.
  • Stress: Everyone experiences stress in various stages of their lives. Excessive or unresolved tension can increase the risk of developing chronic anxiety.
  • Trauma: Severe trauma, like wars, or child abuse, increase the chances of developing anxiety. It can be experienced by the victim themselves, or a close one.
  • Personality type: Some personality types are more susceptible to anxiety. Busy, high-achievers are more at risk of developing anxiety.
  • Sex or gender: women are twice more susceptible as men to have a generalized anxiety disorder and other relevant conditions.

Treatment For Anxiety

After you are diagnosed with anxiety, you can explore the treatment options with your doctor. For some people, medical treatment may not be necessary, considering they may have mild anxiety. Lifestyle changes can help in coping with the symptoms.

Whereas in moderate to severe cases, treatment can help in overcoming the symptoms and lead to manage daily life.

Treatment for anxiety includes two classes: medication and psychotherapy. 

Medications usually include antidepressants, sedatives, and anxiolytic drugs. Most commonly, anxiolytic drugs are used. People often develop anxiety due to various reasons. So, Xanax and Valium can treat the symptoms. However, these are highly addictive drugs and can also cause extreme dependence. Therefore, lesser addictive drugs like fluoxetine and sertraline can be used to treat anxiety.

Meeting the therapist or counselor can help in learning tools to use and coping strategies for anxiety. Some of the natural remedies or coping strategies and techniques to manage anxiety are described below:

  • Meditation and Mindfulness Activities: These activities greatly help reduce the chaotic thoughts and bring a sense of groundedness and calm in the people. It is most effective in relieving stress and anxiety.
  • Physically Active Lifestyle: Improving the physical movements and adding exercise and walking regimen to your routine can help manage your anxiety.
  • Healthy Diet: Including healthy and nutritious meals in your daily routine can help you keep anxiety at bay. Some foods like salmon, turmeric, yogurt, dark chocolate, green tea, and chamomile can help in controlling anxiety. Additionally, stay away from anxiety-causing drinks and foods, typically coffee and tea.
  • Get Adequate Sleep: sleep disturbances are a major sign that you may be experiencing anxiety. However, making conscious efforts to manage your sleep pattern and the cycle can help in managing your anxiety concerns.

Conclusion

This blog provided a comprehensive guide to the question “Do I have Anxiety” and assessed the symptoms of anxiety. It also looked into the types of anxiety disorders and some potential anxiety treatments.

Anxiety generally is not a medical condition but a natural response essential for survival when a person finds themselves in danger. An anxiety disorder may develop when the response is more intense and exaggerated. 

If you have any anxiety disorder, let us know in the comments how you manage it.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Do I Have Anxiety Test

Can you self-diagnose anxiety?

No, you can not self-diagnose anxiety. It is likely that you observe some signs and symptoms of anxiety.  If you have concerns about anxiety, it is advised to seek the help of mental health professional. An accurate diagnosis is made through clinical examination and assessment. The self-tests can only be used for personal purposes; however, to get the confirmed diagnosis, consult a psychologist or psychiatrist.

How do you know if you have test anxiety?

  1. How often have you been affected by nervousness, anxiousness, or felt on edge over the last two weeks?
  2. How often have you been affected or not being able to stop or control worrying over the last two weeks?
  3. How often have you been affected by worrying excessively about different things over the past two weeks?
  4. How often have your worries and stress hindered your studying and learning process?

What are the 5 signs of anxiety?

  1. Sweating
  2. Hyperventilation, rapid heart rate
  3. Trouble focusing or thinking about anything else.
  4. Having a sense of impending doom, danger, or panic.
  5. Restlessness, nervousness, or tension.

Is there a way to measure anxiety?

The STAI or state-trait anxiety inventory is the most commonly researched and extensively used measure of general anxiety and is available in various languages. Numerous clinicians use the STAI scale under rheumatologic conditions. The measure is comparatively brief to administer and is affordable in scoring or interpretation.

References

https://www.healthline.com/health/anxiety#foods

https://dsm.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm05

DSM 5 Anxiety Disorders (A comprehensive guide)

This comprehensive guide will provide the details of the most significant DSM anxiety disorders and the diagnostic criteria for each anxiety disorder.

DSM 5 Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety disorders include the disorders which share the characteristics of excessive anxiety and fear and additional behavioral disturbances. 

DSM 5 includes the following anxiety disorders:

  • Selective Mutism 
  • Separation Anxiety Disorder
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Panic Disorder
  • Agoraphobia
  • Social Phobia or Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Substance or Medication Induced Anxiety Disorder
  • Anxiety Disorder Due to Other Medical Condition

Anxiety is a normal stress response and sometimes is beneficial in certain situations. It helps in alerting people of some dangers and helps them prepare and focus on the way out.

However, anxiety disorders differ from the normal feelings of anxiousness and nervousness, as it includes excessive anxiety and fear.

Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental disorder and influence almost 30 % of adults at some stage of their lives. 

Anxiety disorders can cause people to avoid triggering situations or places or things that worsen the symptoms. These disorders can influence job performance, school productivity, and personal relationships.

Let’s now delve into the details of DSM 5 anxiety disorders and their diagnostic criteria.

Selective Mutism 

The DSM 5 categories selective mutism as an anxiety disorder. Selective Mutism is a childhood disorder and is differentiated by the inability to speak in specific situations, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5).  When the child is in any social environment, like a classroom, in which he is expected to speak up, he may find it difficult to do so. Nonetheless, he may talk effortlessly and smoothly at home. Children with selective mutism usually stay undiagnosed with the disorder until they are in schools, at about 5 to 6 years of age.

The DSM 5 does not associate selective Mutism with trauma, abuse, or neglect. It is not the condition known as traumatic Mutism that may happen suddenly in response to a traumatic event, like losing a loved one.

Signs of Selective Mutism

  • Extreme shyness
  • Emotional outbursts
  • Social isolation; the child does not want to meet and talk to other people.
  • The behavior lasts for at least a month.
  • The child is typically talkative at home with the family members, but they resort to communicating with one-word answers or gestures when in social gatherings.
  • The child is extremely attached to the parents.
  • A determination is made if the condition is resulting in a negative effect on academic and co-curricular activities.
  • The health professionals should rule out the possibility of other disorders, like stuttering or lack of verbal communication in a psychotic disorder.
  • The health professional should rule out the possibility that the child is unable to speak the language or lacks knowledge of the subject.

Separation Anxiety Disorder

The diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder is made according to the following criteria:

  • The child observes excessive or irrational fear or anxiety because of separation from the attachment figure, as shown by three or more of the following conditions:
  1. Regular uncontrollable distress when separated from home or specific people.
  2. Regular uncontrolled worry after losing those people or about them being injured or harmed.
  3. Regular worry about involving an unfortunate event (being lost or sick) that may cause separation from the attachment figures.
  4. Persistent refusal or reluctance to go anywhere or do anything due to the fear of separation.
  5. Persistent refusal or reluctance to sleep away from attachment figures or home.
  6. Frequent nightmares about separation.
  7. Frequent concerns of physical symptoms, like headaches or nausea,  when they are separated from attachment figures or anticipating the separation.
  • The person’s fear and anxiety are persistent, staying at least a month in children and adolescents and at least six months or more in adults.
  • The person’s excessive fear of separation can’t be characterized by other mental disorders.
  • The separation anxiety or fear causes clinically induced distress or changes in essential areas of life.

Some people may also grow extremely uncomfortable when separated from home or attachment figures. According to their age, they may fear the dark, monsters, kidnappers, illness, and other circumstances that can be threatening to them and their close ones.

Obsessive -Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

The diagnostic criteria for obsessive-compulsive disorder according to the DSM-5 is given below:

  1. The occurrence of obsessions and compulsions, or both

Obsessions can be defined as 1 and 2.

  1. Recurring and persistent ideas, thoughts, urges, or impulses that are observed, at some stage during the disturbance, as unwanted and intrusive, and that in most people induce significant distress or anxiety.
  2. The person tries to suppress or ignore these urges, thoughts, or images or dilute them with other actions or thoughts (i.e., by compulsion).

Compulsions can be defined as 1 and 2.

  1. Repetitive behaviors (ordering, hand washing, checking) or mental acts (praying, repeating words silently, counting, etc.) that the person feels necessary to perform in response to an obsession or according to rules should be strictly done.
  2. Behaviors or mental acts aim to minimize or prevent distress or anxiety or prevent some dreaded situation or event; nonetheless, these mental acts or behaviors are not associated in a pragmatic way with what they are programmed to minimize or prevent or are visibly excessive.

It is important to note that young children may not be able to communicate the aims of the mental acts or behaviors.

  1. The obsessions or compulsions are time consuming (i.e., take more one hour per day) or cause clinically significant distress or change in occupational, social, or other important areas of functioning.
  2. The obsessive-compulsive symptoms are not characterized by the psychological impacts of a substance (drug abuses, medications) or other medical conditions.
  3. “The disturbance is not better explained by the symptoms of another mental disorder (e.g., excessive worries, as in generalized anxiety disorder; preoccupation with appearance, as in body dysmorphic disorder; difficulty discarding or parting with possessions, as in hoarding disorder; hair pulling, as in trichotillomania [hair-pulling disorder]; skin picking, as in excoriation [skin-picking] disorder; stereotypies, as in stereotypic movement disorder; ritualized eating behavior, as in eating disorders; preoccupation with substances or gambling, as in substance-related and addictive disorders; preoccupation with having an illness, as in illness anxiety disorder; sexual urges or fantasies, as in paraphilic disorders; impulses, as in disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders; guilty ruminations, as in major depressive disorder; thought insertion or delusional preoccupations, as in schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders; or repetitive patterns of behavior, as in autism spectrum disorder).”

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) include the following:

  • Extreme fear or anxiety induced by the actual or forecasted exposure to two or more of the following conditions:
  1. Being in closed-off places.
  2. Being alone outside of the house.
  3. Standing in line or a crowd.
  4. Being in open areas.
  5. Using public transportation.
  • They avoid the situations because the person believes they may feel stuck or help might be unavailable in the situation, that the person begins to panic.
  • The above-mentioned situations usually induce anxiety or fear.
  • The situations are avoided, require help from a loved one, or are endured with a strong fear.
  • The fear is out of proportion to the possibility of danger.
  • The avoidance or fear is persistent, as it stays for at least six or more months.
  • The avoidance or fear causes significant distress.
  • If another medical condition occurs along with the disorder, the fear or avoidance is undeniably excessive. 

Panic Disorder

DSM-5 categorises the approach by classifying panic attacks by offering just two categories: expected and unexpected panic attacks.

Expected panic attacks are linked with a particular fear like that of flying. Unexpected panic attacks have no visible trigger or cue and they may seem to happen suddenly.

According to DSM-5, a panic attack is attributed to 4 or more of the following symptoms:

  • Sweating
  • Shaking or trembling
  • Palpitations, rapid heart rate, pounding heart,
  • Sensations of shortening of breath.
  • Choking sensation
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting
  • Nausea  or abdominal distress
  •  Derealization or depersonalization
  • Fear of loss of control
  • Fear of dying
  • Chills or hot flushes
  • Numbness or tingling feeling (Paresthesias).

Agoraphobia

DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for agoraphobia include the following:

  • Extreme fear or anxiety induced by the actual or forecasted exposure to two or more of the following conditions:
  1. Being in closed off places.
  2. Being alone outside of the house.
  3. Standing in line or a crowd.
  4. Being in open areas.
  5. Using public transportation.
  • They avoid the situations because the person believes they may feel stuck or help might be unavailable in the situation that the person begins to panic.
  • The above mentioned situations usually induce anxiety or fear.
  • The situations are avoided, require help from a loved one, or are endured with a strong fear.
  • The fear is out of proportion to the possibility of danger.
  • The avoidance or fear is persistent, as it stays for at least six or more months.
  • The avoidance or fear causes significant distress.
  • If another medical condition occurs along with the disorder, the fear or avoidance is undeniably excessive. 

Social Phobia or Social Anxiety Disorder

DSM-5 criteria for social anxiety disorder include the following:

  • Persistent fear or anxiety about certain social situations due to the fear of being judged, humiliated, or embarrassed.
  • Excessive anxiety that is out of proportion
  • Avoidance of anxiety-inducing social environments or attending to them extreme anxiety or fear.
  • Anxiety or fear that impacts daily living.
  • Fear or anxiety that can’t be explained by another medical condition, drug abuse, or medication.

Substance or Medication Induced Anxiety Disorder

The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for substance/medication-induced anxiety disorder are similar to those of the other anxiety disorders; predominantly anxiety, panic, or fear; obsessions and compulsions should not be prevalent as the  OCD has a separate category.

Symptoms must develop during or within a month of intoxication or drug use or within a month of withdrawal, causing anxiety as a result of delirium. The drug must be specified.

Anxiety Disorder Due to Other Medical Condition

When a person experiences anxiety disorder due to other medical conditions, the existence of that medical condition directly leads to the experienced anxiety. Anxiety is a significant feature and may exhibit in the form of panic attacks, Obsessive-compulsive behavior, or generalized anxiety.

Conclusion

This comprehensive guide provided the details of the most significant DSM anxiety disorders and the diagnostic criteria for each anxiety disorder.

Do you have any of the DSM-5 anxiety disorders, let us know how you manage your condition.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): DSM 5 Anxiety Disorders

What are the anxiety disorders in DSM 5?

DSM 5 mentioned some of the prominent anxiety disorders, which are listed below:

  • Selective Mutism 
  • Separation Anxiety Disorder
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Panic Disorder
  • Agoraphobia
  • Social Phobia or Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Substance or Medication Induced Anxiety Disorder
  • Anxiety Disorder Due to Other Medical Condition

What are the symptoms of chronic anxiety?

Some of the common anxiety signs and symptoms are as follow:

  • Nervousness, restlessness, or tension.
  • The sensation of impending doom, panic, danger.
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Hyperventilation
  • Sweating
  • Shaking and trembling
  • Tiredness and fatigue
  • Trouble in concentrations and lack of focus.
  • Trouble in sleeping
  • Excessive worries
  • Gastrointestinal problems

What is high functioning anxiety?

People with high functioning anxiety are usually able to achieve tasks and apparently function well in social setups, but internally they are feeling all the symptoms of anxiety disorder that includes severe feelings of impending doom, anxiety, fear, rapid heart rate, and gastrointestinal problems. 

How do psychiatrists diagnose anxiety?

Psychiatrists may diagnose anxiety by performing a physical examination, inquiring about symptoms, recommending a blood test to rule out the chances of other medical conditions, like hypothyroidism. The doctor may also need to know whether you are taking other medications that could be resulting in similar symptoms.

Citations

https://dsm.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm05

https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/anxiety-disorders/what-are-anxiety-disorders